Uniqlo is the third-largest fashion retailer in the world – behind Swedish multinational H&M, and Zara’s parent company, Inditex, a Spanish multinational. In 2016, with a brand value of $7bn, Uniqlo ranked 91st on the Forbes list of the world’s most valuable brands.

This Japanese fast fashion brand has gained so many achievements and their branding has become one of the most popular icons of brand. And just like the character of Japanese, this logo represents the thorough carefulness and contains many amazing details. Join DS-O to look closer to the details behind Uniqlo’s logo, to see how Japanese culture smartly revealed and Uniqlo delivers it to the world through their own logo.

Japan branding: Uniqlo’s logo design

The original logo introduced in 1991 used a darker wine red and was English only, but the redesign in 2006 strengthened the Japanese qualities of the logo in three ways: introducing a brighter red, including Katakana, and reinforcing the logo’s similarity to a Japanese ink seal.

A bright saturated red circle on a white background represents the sun on Japan’s flag, and this has given the color red deep meaning to Japanese. Therefore, it makes sense that Uniqlo’s red and white logo subconsciously evoke the land of the rising sun. Kashiwa Sato, the lead designer on the New York flagship store, explained in an interview published in Uniqlo’s in-store magazine, “Yanai-san (Uniqlo’s CEO and founder) had a strong desire to communicate Uniqlo as a brand from Japan, so red, which is symbolic of Japan and is indicative of a venture capital spirit, was the perfect color to use in our Global strategy” (Sato). By increasing the brightness and saturation of the red from the previous logo’s wine red to better match Japan’s current flag, Sato-san increased the logo’s ability to evoke Japan.

The original logo introduced in 1991 used a darker wine red and was English only, but the redesign in 2006 strengthened the Japanese qualities of the logo in three ways: introducing a brighter red, including Katakana, and reinforcing the logo’s similarity to a Japanese ink seal.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype,
dịch vụ thiết kế bản sắc thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế pattern,
dịch vụ thiết kế hoạ tiết,
dịch vụ thiết kế ứng dụng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế guidelines thương hiệu.

A bright saturated red circle on a white background represents the sun on Japan’s flag, and this has given the color red deep meaning to Japanese. Therefore, it makes sense that Uniqlo’s red and white logo subconsciously evoke the land of the rising sun. Kashiwa Sato, the lead designer on the New York flagship store, explained in an interview published in Uniqlo’s in-store magazine, “Yanai-san (Uniqlo’s CEO and founder) had a strong desire to communicate Uniqlo as a brand from Japan, so red, which is symbolic of Japan and is indicative of a venture capital spirit, was the perfect color to use in our Global strategy” (Sato). By increasing the brightness and saturation of the red from the previous logo’s wine red to better match Japan’s current flag, Sato-san increased the logo’s ability to evoke Japan.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype,
dịch vụ thiết kế bản sắc thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế pattern,
dịch vụ thiết kế hoạ tiết,
dịch vụ thiết kế ứng dụng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế guidelines thương hiệu.

Further evidence of Uniqlo’s aim to evoke Japan in their logo lies in its use of Katakana, one of Japan’s character sets. Japan has four character sets: Hiragana, which is used for grammar and vocab; Kanji, which are Chinese characters used to represent words; the English alphabet, which is used to add a western and modern aesthetic; and katakana, which is used specifically for foreign words (names, brands, vocabulary) incorporated into the Japanese language.

Young Japanese view foreign brands as cool, so youthful companies such as Uniqlo use katakana words and English in their logos and marketing. Uniqlo’s global approach is especially interesting because in Japan they originally used an English-only logo, but in 2006 lead designer Kawashi Sato redesigned the logo for global use by creating a Japanese version using katakana to go alongside the original English logo, making it a unique dual language logo.

Lastly let’s look at the similarities of Uniqlo’s logo to modern Japanese seals. Most Japanese have a name seal that they use with red ink to do things like sign official documents and open bank accounts. Seals come in circle, oval, rectangular, and square form, but the square form is traditionally used on works of art. By designing their logo to resemble a Japanese seal, Uniqlo further rooted its brand in Japanese aesthetics and continues the Japanese tradition of branding products with a red ink seal.

Further evidence of Uniqlo’s aim to evoke Japan in their logo lies in its use of Katakana, one of Japan’s character sets. Japan has four character sets: Hiragana, which is used for grammar and vocab; Kanji, which are Chinese characters used to represent words; the English alphabet, which is used to add a western and modern aesthetic; and katakana, which is used specifically for foreign words (names, brands, vocabulary) incorporated into the Japanese language.

Young Japanese view foreign brands as cool, so youthful companies such as Uniqlo use katakana words and English in their logos and marketing. Uniqlo’s global approach is especially interesting because in Japan they originally used an English-only logo, but in 2006 lead designer Kawashi Sato redesigned the logo for global use by creating a Japanese version using katakana to go alongside the original English logo, making it a unique dual language logo.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype,
dịch vụ thiết kế bản sắc thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế pattern,
dịch vụ thiết kế hoạ tiết,
dịch vụ thiết kế ứng dụng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế guidelines thương hiệu.

Lastly let’s look at the similarities of Uniqlo’s logo to modern Japanese seals. Most Japanese have a name seal that they use with red ink to do things like sign official documents and open bank accounts. Seals come in circle, oval, rectangular, and square form, but the square form is traditionally used on works of art. By designing their logo to resemble a Japanese seal, Uniqlo further rooted its brand in Japanese aesthetics and continues the Japanese tradition of branding products with a red ink seal.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,l
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype,
dịch vụ thiết kế bản sắc thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế pattern,
dịch vụ thiết kế hoạ tiết,
dịch vụ thiết kế ứng dụng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế guidelines thương hiệu.

hello@ds-o.vn

+84 9 3200 3889

50 Hang Bai, Hoan Kiem, Ha Noi

Newsletter: