Introduced to market in 1985, Frooti is the most popular and best-selling mango-flavored drink in India. Produced by private company Parlé Agro, Frooti was the first drink to be sold in Tetra Pack packaging in the country, as well as the first one to offer a PET bottle and one of those cute TCA Tetra Pak triangles. To add to Frooti’s popularity, the drink’s spokesperson is Shah Rukh Khan, King of Bollywood. Earlier this year, Frooti introduced a new logo and packaging designed by London-based Pentagram partner Harry Pearce and launched a large brand campaign across print, TV, web, and social media created by New York, NY-based Sagmeister & Walsh.

DS-O would like to tell the story of Frooti’s rebranding in this week’s Solution.

/source: How did Frooti rebrand?

The previous logo was exactly what you would expect from a fruit drink logo: round-y, friendly, and fairly generic. The new logo is a very drastic change. It’s very rare to see a leading product change completely and Frooti has gone from its very market-friendly wordmark to a new logo that invites plenty of interpretation, some of which could not be the most ideal. It’s already been criticized for looking to militaristic and it’s hard to deny that; the stencil and dark green color quickly trigger that association. It may look more like the stencils used to mark wooden fruit crates and the angle suggests a little bit of fun informality. Technically, the one odd thing is that the stencil breaks are fairly thin, almost unnoticeable at smaller sizes.

On the packaging the logo looks quite great by adapting its angle to the shape of the container, making the name extremely visible while showing some juicy mangoes in the background. The green and yellow combination of the logo and the product makes for a really nice, friendly combination that softens the military associations. Seeing the logo on the packaging also makes it look like Frooti is part of a survival kit, something very utilitarian that everyone must drink. It’s an interesting change and to further establish that this is not merely a ration beverage, the Frooti brand campaign is a whole lot of fun.

The previous logo was exactly what you would expect from a fruit drink logo: round-y, friendly, and fairly generic. The new logo is a very drastic change. It’s very rare to see a leading product change completely and Frooti has gone from its very market-friendly wordmark to a new logo that invites plenty of interpretation, some of which could not be the most ideal. It’s already been criticized for looking to militaristic and it’s hard to deny that; the stencil and dark green color quickly trigger that association. It may look more like the stencils used to mark wooden fruit crates and the angle suggests a little bit of fun informality. Technically, the one odd thing is that the stencil breaks are fairly thin, almost unnoticeable at smaller sizes.

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dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype.

On the packaging the logo looks quite great by adapting its angle to the shape of the container, making the name extremely visible while showing some juicy mangoes in the background. The green and yellow combination of the logo and the product makes for a really nice, friendly combination that softens the military associations. Seeing the logo on the packaging also makes it look like Frooti is part of a survival kit, something very utilitarian that everyone must drink. It’s an interesting change and to further establish that this is not merely a ration beverage, the Frooti brand campaign is a whole lot of fun.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype.

According to SAGMEISTER & WALSH project page: “The goal was to introduce the new packaging in a fresh, bold, and playful way. The idea we came up with is to create a miniature world using tiny scaled models of vehicles, people and plant life. Only the Frooti packaging and mangos were kept in real life scale. This allowed the packaging and the mango to appear as the hero of the shots while allowing us to tell stories and add moments of humor. We introduced four bold colors to the brand which complement the yellow of Indian mango and add a sense of playfulness across the imagery.”

To introduce the new logo and packaging, Sagmeister & Walsh have created a charmingly surreal universe where miniature people and about a total of five adorable palm trees take care of the different packaging and mangoes. The 3D-printed people are beautifully photographed against very bright and colorful colors that complement the green and yellow packaging. The tiny size of the people and all their accoutrements (from vehicles to ladders) don’t allow for painting with perfect precision so this gives them a rough, tumbled look that goes very well with the weathered colors and paint jobs seen across India.

According to SAGMEISTER & WALSH project page: “The goal was to introduce the new packaging in a fresh, bold, and playful way. The idea we came up with is to create a miniature world using tiny scaled models of vehicles, people and plant life. Only the Frooti packaging and mangos were kept in real life scale. This allowed the packaging and the mango to appear as the hero of the shots while allowing us to tell stories and add moments of humor. We introduced four bold colors to the brand which complement the yellow of Indian mango and add a sense of playfulness across the imagery.”

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype.

To introduce the new logo and packaging, Sagmeister & Walsh have created a charmingly surreal universe where miniature people and about a total of five adorable palm trees take care of the different packaging and mangoes. The 3D-printed people are beautifully photographed against very bright and colorful colors that complement the green and yellow packaging. The tiny size of the people and all their accoutrements (from vehicles to ladders) don’t allow for painting with perfect precision so this gives them a rough, tumbled look that goes very well with the weathered colors and paint jobs seen across India.

Design Studi- Online,
Design Studio Online,
DS-O,
DSO,
dsovn,
design studio,
studio online,
design,
studio,
dịch vụ thiết kế đồ họa chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ graphic design,
dịch vụ design,
dịch vụ tư vấn định hướng hình ảnh chuyên nghiệp,
dịch vụ thiết kế nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế hệ thống nhận diện thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế visual identity,
dịch vụ thiết kế logo,
dịch vụ thiết kế biểu tượng thương hiệu,
dịch vụ thiết kế logosymbol,
dịch vụ thiết kế logotype.

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